Don’t Let Someone Else Live Your Life

There’s this issue in society that I’ve seen come up again and again, and I’ve seen it in multiple forms.

When I was in high school, I would always answer the question of “what do you want to be when you grow up?” with “I want to be a writer”, to which most teachers would respond, “oh, that’s not a practical job, you can’t make much money with that. Why don’t you do something else – you could be a teacher instead.”

The other day, when I was at the gym, I met a woman in her fifties who was enthusing over another woman’s bright red and orange dreadlocks, and she mentioned that she had recently gone to the hairdresser’s asking for a funky haircut herself, to which the hairdresser responded, “oh, you’re much too old for that, I wouldn’t do that to you.”

I recently read an article about a girl who described herself as ‘fat’, and she stated that when she went to the beach in her bikini, she was spotted by a woman who responded to her by saying, “you’re much too big for that bikini, I don’t want to see that. Why don’t you wear something that covers you up a bit more?”

And I very recently watched a video posted on Elle Magazine’s Facebook page discussing an eight year old boy who enjoyed dressing and performing as a drag queen, and in this video he mentioned that he knew other kids who would go to their parents saying that they wanted to be drag queens, to which their parents would respond “you’re too young to even know what that is”.

Now, there’s a lot going on in all of these examples, but the common theme that I notice, the thing that really gets under my skin, is this idea of telling other people what they can and can’t be, the acceptable ways of expressing themselves, based off of your limited understanding of who they are and what they are capable of.

And this happens so often, and in so many different ways. In the above mentioned examples, we see at least three different types of discrimination as well.

In the example of the woman in her fifties wanting to get a funky haircut, we see a prime example of ageism, or discrimination against someone based on their age. The woman was deemed to be too old to look good with a funky hairstyle, and so the hairdresser refused to give it to her, but when it really comes down to it – why? Why wouldn’t she look good with a funky hairstyle? And more than that, who is the hairdresser to judge if she would or would not? If the woman in question wants to express herself in that way, and if it would make her feel more comfortable in her own skin, then what is so wrong about it? But we as a society have a very basic understanding of what someone in that age group should be – they should be humble, quiet, non-offensive, ready to wind down and start taking things slow, and so when someone comes along to challenge all that, we don’t like it. We tell them that they can’t do that. Which is really unfair, because it limits the way that they get to express themselves and find comfort in their own skin.

In the example of the larger woman in a bikini, we see one of the most classic examples of fat shaming. I don’t know a whole lot about the woman in her bikini – I don’t know if she felt like she was rocking the bikini or if she was already a little bit self-conscious about it, but the one thing I do know is that she did not deserve to be told that she shouldn’t wear it. Because she should. If she wants to put her body in a bikini, then she should put that body in a bikini, and she should have the opportunity to go out and look fabulous and be her beautiful self. Her body and her bikini was not the problem here. The problem was the other woman’s limited idea of what beauty is. She decided (because she was told this by society) that only thin women look good in bikinis, and therefore, only thin women should wear bikinis. Larger women should spend their lives enrobed by the shame one-piece, forever going to the beach in frumpy tee shirts and acceptably covering shorts.

And lastly, in the example of the children who wanted to dress in drag, we see an example of sexism and/or homophobia. A lot of people see gender as a very two-way street: you are either male or female, and especially when it comes to children, a lot of parents fear that deviating from that two-way street will result in their children becoming ‘other’. Their sons will grow up gay, their daughters will grow up confused, cats will live with dogs, havoc will erupt upon the city, and dear god, will someone please think of the children! There are two major problems with this thinking: 1) we already force children who are LGBT+ to act straight and/or cis-gendered, but that doesn’t cause them to grow up to be straight and/or cis-gendered, and 2) this sort of thinking hinges on the belief that being LGBT+ is wrong and must therefore be avoided. Children must give a very limited, very prescribed performance of gender, or else they risk becoming queer, but even if they did, what would be wrong with that? And, almost worse, by telling children that they shouldn’t know what drag queens or anything similar to that are, you are indirectly telling them that being a drag queen or anything similar is wrong or dirty, which poses one of two risks: either they start treating their fellow LGBT+ children accordingly, or they internalize these opinions about themselves, that they are wrong and they are dirty, because they are LGBT+. We associate being gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, gender-queer, drag queen, etc., as being an ‘adult thing’, but most everyone who falls under those categories as an adult can tell you that it started somewhere in their childhood, or that they knew it all along. So if this is the case, and if children most certainly can be something other than straight or cis-gendered, then why do we force them to act otherwise?

One of our societies many problems is that we are constantly limiting one another. We see each other in very basic, very simple ways, and then we act accordingly: a person is either fat, thin, young, old, child, woman, man, this, or that, and when they start to step outside of those lines, to challenge our ways of seeing them, we tell them, “oh, no, no, don’t you do that – get back into that line where you belong!”

But that isn’t how things works. People are more than the labels we give them, and they should be allowed to express themselves in any way that they see fit.

So if you are a fifty, sixty, ninety year old woman who wants to get a bright green mohawk, do it! If you’re four hundred pounds of pure awesome and you want to wear your stylish new bikini to the beach, then please be the most beautiful, most confident person there! If you want to dress in drag, or express your gender in a way that is sort of unconventional, then you will look all the better for it because you will be expressing who you truly are, and nothing is more beautiful than that!

And to go back to the example of my wanting to be a writer – if you have a dream that other people tell you is unrealistic, but you still need to pursue it, then pursue it for all it’s worth. Trust me, it will make your life so much more fulfilling.

Don’t ever let someone else live your life for you. You are amazing, and you are so incredibly strong and capable. So even if you do face the occasional doubter or nay-sayer, just remember that they’re speaking from a very limited understanding and that they don’t know you. You know you, and at the end of the day, you are the only person who has to be satisfied with your life.

What It Means to Have Privilege

Privilege comes in a wide variety of forms.

People can experience privilege in terms of race, gender, or sexual orientation. People can experience privilege if they are able-bodied, neurotypical, or cis-gendered. Chances are, every single person in our society experiences some form of privilege, for one reason or another. Privilege is not something to be ashamed of, and it is not something that makes you an inherently worse person. Privilege is only something to keep in mind.

And why am I bringing this up? Why am I saying all of this? Because privilege is something that people have begun talking about more and more often lately, and in my opinion, that should be encouraged, because it is something that we should talk about. However, there are many people who take offence to the idea of privilege, and who may even deny that it exists.

 

To illustrate this, let’s create a very common, more specific scenario: a group of people are talking about race. Ted, a white person, keeps asserting that black people are treated in this way, and that the only appropriate reaction to it is that. Sue hears this and disagrees, and so she says, “you’re speaking from a place of privilege”.

Now, there are two ways that Ted can interpret this comment. On the one hand, he can assume that Sue meant it maliciously, that she is intentionally trying to belittle his perspective and tell him that it doesn’t matter as much as a person of colour’s perspective would. On the other hand, he can see it for the comment’s most common meaning: that Ted is white. He is not black. He has never been black. He does not know what it is like to live as a black person, and therefore he has no idea what they experience and how they should feel – at least not from a first-hand experience.

This is not a moral judgement against Ted. He cannot help being born the way that he was, and even if he could, there is nothing wrong with being any race, gender, sexual orientation, level of ability, or anything to that effect. However, that being said, it is important for Ted to keep in mind that his experience is not universal.

In our society, whether we like it or not, people are treated differently from one another based on superfluous things like skin colour and genitals. These sort of things do effect our lives and our experiences. For example, a white person will not be turned away from a job based solely on judgements made about their race. A man does not have to worry about his rights to reproductive health being taken away or made more difficult to access. A straight person does not have to worry about whether or not their families will still have contact with them when they finally admit who they love, and so on and so forth. None of these are that specific person’s fault – it is all based on the society in question and what rights and abilities that society has decided a person should have access to.

However, when someone lives their life taking these sort of things for granted, it becomes too easy for them to just assume that these are things that everyone has access to, and too easy for them to forget that they don’t. And that is why it is so important that we talk about our privilege – because if we don’t talk about it, then we forget that we even have it.

But saying that you have privilege is not a moral judgement, and it does not mean that your life was constantly easy. Nobody’s life is easy, no matter how much privilege you have, and nobody is forgetting that or taking away from your hardships by reminding you of your privilege. All that they are saying is that you lack the lived experience of someone in that scenario, and in that one part of your life, things might have been a little easier for you than for another person.

So please, don’t be afraid to awknowledge your privilege. Don’t be afraid to admit that you might have it a little easier in one regard of your life than another person. Because once you can admit that, once you can accept that your experience is not universal and that other people deal with different hardships, then you can open your mind to other perspectives and learn about them, maybe even help them a little bit.

There’s nothing wrong with having privilege. We all do. The only place you can really go wrong is denying someone else their right to speak out about their own unique perspective.